#Official Mining Thread

Developments in Regional South Australia. Including Port Lincoln, Victor Harbor, Wallaroo, Gawler and Mount Barker.
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SouthAussie94
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Re: #Official Mining Thread

#1381 Post by SouthAussie94 » Fri Aug 25, 2017 10:36 pm

SBD wrote:
Fri Aug 25, 2017 9:17 pm
SouthAussie94 wrote:
Thu Aug 24, 2017 6:16 pm

Copper Concentrate from their Prominent Hill mine (near Coober Pedy) is taken by rail to Port Adelaide where it is loaded onto ships and exported. I'd imagine that any processing plant would be located either onsite at the mine, or at a location somewhere near the rail line. Port Augusta? Port Adelaide? Somewhere else? Could be anyone's guess...
Most recent I can find is Q1 update which says the preferred site is near Port Augusta. Earlier thoughts had included signing an MoU with Arrium to build it at Whyalla.
Port Augusta would make sense. Rail from Prom Hill/Carra, process at Augusta, rail to Port Adelaide, export overseas (or export directly from Port Augusta)
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Re: #Official Mining Thread

#1382 Post by bits » Sat Aug 26, 2017 6:11 am

SouthAussie94 wrote: (or export directly from Port Augusta)
How?
Does Port Augusta have any export port? Is the gulf deep or wide enough to bring sizable ships that far up?
Whyalla or Port Adelaide are the realistic export ports.

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Re: #Official Mining Thread

#1383 Post by SBD » Sat Aug 26, 2017 11:54 pm

bits wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 6:11 am
SouthAussie94 wrote: (or export directly from Port Augusta)
How?
Does Port Augusta have any export port? Is the gulf deep or wide enough to bring sizable ships that far up?
Whyalla or Port Adelaide are the realistic export ports.
I think they also get decent sized ships in to Port Pirie, but agree that Port Augusta and Port Paterson (where the power stations were) are too small to be useful.

Something I found online suggested the processing plant would be on the eastern side of the railway line about half way from the tomato farm to the Horrocks Pass road.

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Re: #Official Mining Thread

#1384 Post by rhino » Mon Aug 28, 2017 11:48 am

bits wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 6:11 am
SouthAussie94 wrote: (or export directly from Port Augusta)
How?
Does Port Augusta have any export port? Is the gulf deep or wide enough to bring sizable ships that far up?
Whyalla or Port Adelaide are the realistic export ports.
More precisely, Port Bonython (once the new jetty is built) or Port Adelaide, although Port Pirie would also be capable. Whyalla, while technically capable, would be unlikely due to the ship not being able to be loaded at a wharf. If the concentrate has to be railed from the plant to the wharf, this double-handling at port would preclude Whyalla, IMO.
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Re: #Official Mining Thread

#1385 Post by rhino » Tue Jan 23, 2018 11:03 am

From ABC News online:

New iron ore mines to feed Whyalla steelworks and boost SA exports
A new South Australian iron ore mine has been approved to feed Whyalla's steelworks at cheaper cost, and another to boost iron ore exports from the region.

The new mining leases have been approved in the Middleback Range on Eyre Peninsula and add to Whyalla businessman Sanjeev Gupta's assets portfolio.

His company SIMEC Mining has gained approval for the Iron Sultan mine — which will feed the Whyalla steelworks — and the Iron Warrior mine, which will produce up to 1.5 million tonnes of export iron ore annually.

The ventures are expected to support a workforce of 56 as well as another 130 contractors.

They are the first approvals for the Whyalla region since SIMEC acquired Middleback Range mining leases as part of Gupta GFG Alliance's purchase of debt-laden steelmaker Arrium.

SA Mineral Resources Minister Tom Koutsantonis said the Iron Sultan mine would develop a hybrid pellet feed plant to significantly reduce the price of making steel at the Whyalla blast furnace.

"Iron Sultan will play a significant role in reducing the costs of steelmaking at Whyalla steelworks, while Iron Warrior continues South Australia's role as a reliable iron ore exporter," he said.

"Approval of these two mines demonstrates the commitment of the new owner to develop its South Australian iron ore assets and create a more sustainable steelmaking business."
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Re: #Official Mining Thread

#1386 Post by rev » Wed Nov 28, 2018 2:26 pm

Impressive copper exploration results revealed by BHP point to SA’s copper renaissance
Cameron England, Business editor, The Advertiser
November 28, 2018 6:00am
Subscriber only

It could be bigger than Olympic Dam
BHP: Mining giant marks 30 years at Olympic Dam

IN terms of copper deposits, South Australia is often referred to as “elephant country”.

But until two decades ago, we’d only discovered one elephant — the world’s largest polymetallic ore deposit at Olympic Dam, which a group of renegade explorers at Western Mining Corporation discovered in a high-risk exploration program in 1975.

It was more than two decades later, in 2001, that exploration minnow Minotaur Resources discovered the Prominent Hill deposit — now a mine which produces more than 100,000 tonnes of copper per year.

Then in 2005, one-man band Rudy Gomez found the Carrapateena deposit just west of Lake Torrens, which is currently being developed into a $916 million mine by Adelaide mining company OZ Minerals.

In the space of three decades we’ve gone from one major copper mine to three, factoring in Carrapateena’s start up next year. And the impressive copper exploration results revealed by BHP yesterday — an intersection of 180m at a grade of more than 6 per cent about 1km below the surface — indicate we could be on a path to more.

But why has it taken so long for South Australia to capitalise on its resources riches in this area?

Copper has a storeyed history in South Australia. While the myth is that Australia’s wealth was initially derived “riding on the sheep’s back”, in SA the “Monster Mine” at Burra, discovered in 1845, and other mines at Kapunda, Moonta, Wallaroo and Kanmantoo provided the early wealth for the young colony and also a significant proportion of the world’s copper supplies.

These early copper projects were near or at the surface, meaning mining and discovery was straightforward.

The difficulty in modern times is that, to mix metaphors, the low-hanging fruit has all been plucked, and SA’s geology means that while more massive copper deposits are suspected to exist, they are hidden hundreds of metres under a cap of rock and dirt.

Image
Existing South Australian copper mines. Picture: OZ Minerals

Paul Heithersay, chief executive of the State Government’s Department for Energy and Mining, has for many years used a graph which shows the dramatic difference in size between the Olympic Dam deposit — which is estimated can be mined for up to another 100 years — and other copper deposits, such as Prominent Hill, which have been discovered.

The graph shows that in other areas around the world, copper deposits exist on a continuum. Where one elephant roams, there are likely to be more.

But in SA, the size of Olympic Dam, the discovery of which was based on exploration theories considered radical at the time, sits by itself in terms of sheer magnitude.

The reason is obvious — it is very difficult to discover minerals under 400-1000m of rock. But it has been done.

Paul Heithersay, chief executive of the State Government’s Department for Energy and Mining, has for many years used a graph which shows the dramatic difference in size between the Olympic Dam deposit — which is estimated can be mined for up to another 100 years — and other copper deposits, such as Prominent Hill, which have been discovered.

The graph shows that in other areas around the world, copper deposits exist on a continuum. Where one elephant roams, there are likely to be more.

But in SA, the size of Olympic Dam, the discovery of which was based on exploration theories considered radical at the time, sits by itself in terms of sheer magnitude.

The reason is obvious — it is very difficult to discover minerals under 400-1000m of rock. But it has been done.In 2005, after 17 years of trying to find partners to help him fund the drilling of exploration holes at his Carrapateena prospect in the state’s Far North, Rudy Gomez bet his life savings on two drill holes which would punch more than 600m into the rock.

It was a good bet. Mr Gomez eventually reaped more than $100 million when he sold the project.

It has long been rumoured that BHP had come across some interesting exploration results somewhere in the state’s Far North.

While those rumours were probably just that, the company’s announcement yesterday is sure to fire up other explorers keen to test their exploration theories. Share prices have already started to move based on this theory.

Mr Gomez himself has other projects on the go. And small, listed companies, such as Argonaut Resources, are also preparing to drill.

All of this activity could be a boon for the state.

The previous Labor government instigated the state’s copper strategy, which aims to boost copper production in SA to one million tonnes a year over the next 20 years. We have a way to go.

While we have about 68 per cent of Australia’s copper resources, most of that tied up in Olympic Dam, we produced only about a third of the nation’s copper in 2015.

In that year, copper production was 284,314 tonnes. While BHP has plans, some solid and some still on the drawing board, to expand Olympic Dam, hitting that target will involve the development of a number of new mines.

But the global demand for copper is there, and the potential lies within SA to find and produce more of the metal, which is integral to developing economies as they consume more power, cars and electrical goods.

And GFG Alliance is also planning to build a copper smelter in SA.

The state’s second copper boom could be in the making.

https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/business ... bdaaee5a75

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