SA Economy

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Re: SA Economy

#436 Post by bits » Mon Dec 09, 2019 9:26 am

I thought the GST was split based on things like the states demographic.
SA gets more GST because it houses a higher percentage of retired Australians.
The more elderly the more GST to cover their costs.

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Re: SA Economy

#437 Post by ml69 » Mon Dec 09, 2019 7:35 pm

No one doubts the great lifestyle we have in Adelaide, we are one of the most liveable cities in the world after all.

I would argue that a place like Melbourne growing at breakneck speed could become less liveable over the medium-long term with increased crime levels (we witnessed this already in Melb with gang violence), increased congestion and increased commuting times (less family time).

The fastest growing cities in the United States are not New York or Los Angeles, they are mid-size cities like San Antonio, Austin and Phoenix.

These cities offer lifestyle as well as JOB OPPORTUNITIES. That’s the thing we’re really missing in Adelaide, job opportunities.

Once we get private sector job growth (not just reliant on government contracts like the submarines), we will see population growth follow suit with ex-Adelaide people returning as well as new migrants coming here.

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Re: SA Economy

#438 Post by gnrc_louis » Mon Dec 09, 2019 8:01 pm

ml69 wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 7:35 pm
Once we get private sector job growth (not just reliant on government contracts like the submarines), we will see population growth follow suit with ex-Adelaide people returning as well as new migrants coming here.
Might be waiting a while for that: https://www.afr.com/policy/economy/publ ... 108-h19u57

Similar this year too. South Australia is unlikely to see much of an increase in private sector jobs unless it can find itself more niche industries to focus on.

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Re: SA Economy

#439 Post by SBD » Tue Dec 10, 2019 11:17 am

gnrc_louis wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 8:01 pm
ml69 wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 7:35 pm
Once we get private sector job growth (not just reliant on government contracts like the submarines), we will see population growth follow suit with ex-Adelaide people returning as well as new migrants coming here.
Might be waiting a while for that: https://www.afr.com/policy/economy/publ ... 108-h19u57

Similar this year too. South Australia is unlikely to see much of an increase in private sector jobs unless it can find itself more niche industries to focus on.
So the questions should be around what things are Adelaide and SA good at in either an absolute or relative sense.

I think I read somewhere that we actually rank quite highly on manufacturing, and I don’t think that relied on the now-absent big automotive assembly.

Other things we seem to be good at are education, food and wine, and renewable energy. Thomas Foods International is building a new factory near Murray Bridge to replace the one that burnt down. We have a lot of wind farms, but Vestas has opened a new assembly site in Geelong, perhaps as Victoria is now getting bigger farms to catch up to us. We are behind other states in large solar farms, maybe manufacturing for those is still a private sector opportunity as we move to catch up.

Overall, I have no idea if engineering or architecture are fields that Adelaide could lead. Film making is also something that seems to be a possible niche.

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Re: SA Economy

#440 Post by Jaymz » Mon Jan 20, 2020 12:37 pm

Article in today's Advertiser saying that S.A's population grew at 0.9% for 2019. Our fastest rate for 5 years but still the slowest of all the states. Can post full article if anyone really interested.

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Re: SA Economy

#441 Post by Will » Mon Jan 20, 2020 12:54 pm

Jaymz wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 12:37 pm
Article in today's Advertiser saying that S.A's population grew at 0.9% for 2019. Our fastest rate for 5 years but still the slowest of all the states. Can post full article if anyone really interested.
yes, that would be nice. thanks

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Re: SA Economy

#442 Post by SRW » Mon Jan 20, 2020 1:04 pm

I'd be interested to see whether our loss to interstate migration has decreased or if we're still reliant on being an easier visa for international arrivals (an advantage lost now that Perth and Gold Coast are also declared 'regional' areas).
Keep Adelaide Weird

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Re: SA Economy

#443 Post by Will » Mon Jan 20, 2020 1:12 pm

SRW wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 1:04 pm
I'd be interested to see whether our loss to interstate migration has decreased or if we're still reliant on being an easier visa for international arrivals (an advantage lost now that Perth and Gold Coast are also declared 'regional' areas).
net interstate migration losses have decreased to approximately 4000 per year.

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Re: SA Economy

#444 Post by Jaymz » Mon Jan 20, 2020 1:40 pm

As requested.......

SA records highest level of population growth in five years – but still lags behind every other state
South Australia has a population paradox – we’re growing faster than at any time since 2014 but being eclipsed by Tasmania. What does this mean for our economy?

Daniel Wills, State Political Editor, The Advertiser

January 19, 2020 2:00pm
Close

South Australia population growth rate has risen to the highest level in five years, but remains the lowest of all states, as Tasmania steals a march in the race for new residents.

Latest Australian Bureau of Statistics figures show SA recorded 0.9 per cent population growth in 2019 – compared to a national average of 1.5 per cent – rising to 1.75 million people.

It is the best result since 2014, and marks a fourth successive year of increased growth.

However, Tasmania’s tourism-driven rebirth has led to it going from a population laggard for much of the past decade to eclipsing SA performance in each of the past two years.

POPULATION GROWTH PER YEAR
POPULATION GROWTH PER YEAR
Year — SA — Tas — Australia

2019 — 0.9 — 1.1 — 1.5

2018 — 0.7 — 1.1 — 1.6

2017 — 0.6 — 0.6 — 1.6

2016 — 0.5 — 0.5 — 1.4

2015 — 0.8 — 0.4 — 1.4

2014 — 0.9 — 0.3 — 1.6

2013 — 0.9 — 0.2 — 1.8

2012 — 1.0 — 0.2 — 1.6

2011 — 0.8 — 0.6 — 1.4

2010 — 1.2 — 0.9 — 1.7

(Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics)

The increase follows Premier Steven Marshall’s signature election commitment of increasing the state’s population growth to around the national average, as a key driver for the economy.

Business SA chief executive Martin Haese said Tasmania’s tourism sector had swelled in the wake of major investments, like the Museum of Old and New Art, which created positive experiences and word of mouth that led to people making the move for good.

He said there were promising projects on the horizon for SA, including the $90 billion defence program and Lot Fourteen, but the state must be “more ambitious” in the short-term.

Mr Haese said that included a strong focus on both leisure and business tourism.

“There are two things happening in Tasmania. They have actually got very strong tourism growth, and population,” he said.

“Tourism is a showcase. “You are exposing that place to many more people from many more countries. “You hear a lot of anecdotal evidence of people saying ‘I visited X, Y, Z five years ago and loved it so we’ve now moved there.”

Mr Haese said immigration deals which made Adelaide more appealing had worked before and were essential to combating a natural draw of new arrivals settling in bigger cities.

Innovation and Skills Minister David Pisoni said recent improvements were encouraging, but “we know there’s a lot more work to be done to continue to strengthen our economy”.

“We have a strong focus on growing the regions, and with almost half the jobs advertised in regional SA remaining unfilled, it makes sense to bolster skilled migration in the regions to help train more South Australians and fill skills gaps,” he said.

“We’ve focused on attracting the skilled workers needed to grow and transition the state’s economy in areas such as space, cyber security and defence, as well as more established sectors like health, aged care and tourism.”

He said regulatory changes including an increase to SA’s quota of state nominated skilled migration places, two regional agreements and an entrepreneur visa were key steps.

Opposition treasury spokesman Stephen Mullighan said expert analysis had indicated SA was unlikely to achieve a massive increase in population growth in the next few years.

“Steven Marshall and the Liberals promised to increase our population growth, yet it continues to be sluggish in SA,” he said. “We need thousands of families moving to SA each year.

“Our economy is crying out for skilled workers, particularly for new defence projects.”

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Re: SA Economy

#445 Post by ml69 » Thu Jan 23, 2020 7:43 am

Jaymz wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 1:40 pm
As requested.......

SA records highest level of population growth in five years – but still lags behind every other state
South Australia has a population paradox – we’re growing faster than at any time since 2014 but being eclipsed by Tasmania. What does this mean for our economy?

Daniel Wills, State Political Editor, The Advertiser

January 19, 2020 2:00pm
Close

South Australia population growth rate has risen to the highest level in five years, but remains the lowest of all states, as Tasmania steals a march in the race for new residents.

Latest Australian Bureau of Statistics figures show SA recorded 0.9 per cent population growth in 2019 – compared to a national average of 1.5 per cent – rising to 1.75 million people.

It is the best result since 2014, and marks a fourth successive year of increased growth.

However, Tasmania’s tourism-driven rebirth has led to it going from a population laggard for much of the past decade to eclipsing SA performance in each of the past two years.

POPULATION GROWTH PER YEAR
POPULATION GROWTH PER YEAR
Year — SA — Tas — Australia

2019 — 0.9 — 1.1 — 1.5

2018 — 0.7 — 1.1 — 1.6

2017 — 0.6 — 0.6 — 1.6

2016 — 0.5 — 0.5 — 1.4

2015 — 0.8 — 0.4 — 1.4

2014 — 0.9 — 0.3 — 1.6

2013 — 0.9 — 0.2 — 1.8

2012 — 1.0 — 0.2 — 1.6

2011 — 0.8 — 0.6 — 1.4

2010 — 1.2 — 0.9 — 1.7

(Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics)

The increase follows Premier Steven Marshall’s signature election commitment of increasing the state’s population growth to around the national average, as a key driver for the economy.

Business SA chief executive Martin Haese said Tasmania’s tourism sector had swelled in the wake of major investments, like the Museum of Old and New Art, which created positive experiences and word of mouth that led to people making the move for good.

He said there were promising projects on the horizon for SA, including the $90 billion defence program and Lot Fourteen, but the state must be “more ambitious” in the short-term.

Mr Haese said that included a strong focus on both leisure and business tourism.

“There are two things happening in Tasmania. They have actually got very strong tourism growth, and population,” he said.

“Tourism is a showcase. “You are exposing that place to many more people from many more countries. “You hear a lot of anecdotal evidence of people saying ‘I visited X, Y, Z five years ago and loved it so we’ve now moved there.”

Mr Haese said immigration deals which made Adelaide more appealing had worked before and were essential to combating a natural draw of new arrivals settling in bigger cities.

Innovation and Skills Minister David Pisoni said recent improvements were encouraging, but “we know there’s a lot more work to be done to continue to strengthen our economy”.

“We have a strong focus on growing the regions, and with almost half the jobs advertised in regional SA remaining unfilled, it makes sense to bolster skilled migration in the regions to help train more South Australians and fill skills gaps,” he said.

“We’ve focused on attracting the skilled workers needed to grow and transition the state’s economy in areas such as space, cyber security and defence, as well as more established sectors like health, aged care and tourism.”

He said regulatory changes including an increase to SA’s quota of state nominated skilled migration places, two regional agreements and an entrepreneur visa were key steps.

Opposition treasury spokesman Stephen Mullighan said expert analysis had indicated SA was unlikely to achieve a massive increase in population growth in the next few years.

“Steven Marshall and the Liberals promised to increase our population growth, yet it continues to be sluggish in SA,” he said. “We need thousands of families moving to SA each year.

“Our economy is crying out for skilled workers, particularly for new defence projects.”
If we are serious about increasing our population growth, we should double-down on our tourism industry and aim to replicate Tasmania’s success.

Some ideas that come to mind are: vastly expanding our spring festival offering in Oct and Nov, fast-track a Glenelg to KI ferry service and fast-track the Indigenous Culture gallery at Lot 14.

Many interstate people have never visited SA or haven’t been here for decades are pleasantly surprised at what we have here once they come.

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Re: SA Economy

#446 Post by ghs » Thu Jan 23, 2020 10:57 pm

ml69 wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 7:43 am

If we are serious about increasing our population growth, we should double-down on our tourism industry and aim to replicate Tasmania’s success.

Some ideas that come to mind are: vastly expanding our spring festival offering in Oct and Nov, fast-track a Glenelg to KI ferry service and fast-track the Indigenous Culture gallery at Lot 14.

Many interstate people have never visited SA or haven’t been here for decades are pleasantly surprised at what we have here once they come.
1) KI is now predominantly burnt wasteland. A Glenelg to KI ferry existed previously and it wasn't viable.

2) Expanding the spring festival season isn't going to happen. The fashion festival and motorsport festival were both canned last year.

3) There's been some pretty ordinary things happen in SA over the last 20 years such as the state bank disaster and the loss
of the car industry, but to think that we can't beat Tasmania in population growth is nothing short of disgraceful.

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Re: SA Economy

#447 Post by how good is he » Thu Jan 23, 2020 11:16 pm

I think it’s more employment/jobs being the key to population growth (both coming in and reason for those leaving). Until there is significant change in employment and the types of jobs, I expect our limited population growth to continue.

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Re: SA Economy

#448 Post by ghs » Thu Jan 23, 2020 11:58 pm

how good is he wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 11:16 pm
I think it’s more employment/jobs being the key to population growth (both coming in and reason for those leaving). Until there is significant change in employment and the types of jobs, I expect our limited population growth to continue.
Tasmania isn't an economic powerhouse but still they have higher population growth. It's pathetic.

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Re: SA Economy

#449 Post by Norman » Fri Jan 24, 2020 6:32 am

A lot of people are moving to Tasmania for the better air quality and lower temperatures, I guess you could call them climate refugees. They might also prefer the slower pace of Hobart and Launceston compared to Melbourne or Sydney. I don't think people are moving there for jobs unless it's in tourism, which has been their main economic driver in recent times.

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Re: SA Economy

#450 Post by rhino » Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:13 am

ghs wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 11:58 pm
Tasmania isn't an economic powerhouse but still they have higher population growth. It's pathetic.
What is the demographic of people moving to Tasmania? Clean air and a slower pace attracts retirees. Retirees travel and spend to start with, but that reduces the further they are into retirement. Then (with all due respect) they slowly become a drain on services and a burden to society. They still have a right to be there of course, but it doesn't really mean a stronger economy due to a larger population.
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