News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#676 Post by PeFe » Fri Dec 27, 2019 11:52 pm

Another VPP for South Australia, but this time incorporating blockchain.
From PV Magazine
Sonnen, Natural Solar join SA blockchain-enabled virtual power plant

Western Australian energy trading technology company Power Ledger and wholesaler energy retailer Powerclub have teamed up with German battery manufacturer sonnen and solar and battery installer Natural Solar to launch their virtual power plant pilot in South Australia. The project is the first large-scale commercial rollout of blockchain technology for solar energy trading in Australia.

Image

Blockchain authenticates the trading between households, keeping track of the P2P exchange of energy.
Image: Power Ledger

Four of the big players in the energy sector are joining forces to give South Australian households greater control over their energy use through a blockchain-enabled virtual power plant (VPP). Unveiled last month by Perth-based peer-to-peer (P2P) energy trading specialist Power Ledger and electricity wholesaler Powerclub, the project has entered the next stage with German battery manufacturer sonnen and Australian installer Natural Solar on board.

In one of its biggest promises to customers connected to the electricity grid, blockchain-based P2P trading gives more choice on how to manage power use and evade additional hidden costs and mark-ups by the electricity retailer to cover supply costs. In the South Australian trial, Powerclub users who invest in solar and battery storage will have real-time access to leverage the wholesale market.

The households participating in the trial will also have the opportunity to tap into the state’s battery subsidy scheme offering subsidies of up to $6,000 based on eligibility. On top of that, the first 20 Powerclub users to sign up to the pilot will receive a further $500 discount.

“We anticipate the VPP will deliver thousands in annual electricity savings for participating South Australians,” says Powerclub Founder and CEO, Stuart McPherson. The pilot is expected to expand to the east coast in early next year with the full-featured VPP available in mid-2020
.

A newcomer to Australia’s National Electricity Market (NEM) operating since earlier this year, Powerclub provides access to electricity at wholesale prices to its members for an annual membership fee of $39. With the help of Power Ledger’s VPP energy trading application, Powerclub will allow its members with batteries to sell excess solar power during periods of high energy demand and price spikes, which will help in reducing annual energy costs and paying back their investment in distributed energy resources faster.

For the Perth-based energy trading software company, the new deal represents a major milestone and its first large-scale commercial rollout in Australia. The company is now running a significant number of projects on the home turf as well as in other countries including Thailand, Japan, the United States.

Natural Solar and sonnen have partnered with the duo to provide the infrastructure required for the rollout. According to Chris Williams, CEO & Founder of Natural Solar, the installer has joined the project to push the boundaries and benefit its customers with the help of Power Ledger’s technology and Powerclub’s no-profit processes.

“It’s these significant advances in technology that are furthering the home battery storage market and swiftly setting the standard for households in Australia,” said Williams.

Last year, Natural Solar and sonnen came together to deploy a mini blockchain-enabled VPP in Sydney. The trial saw a group of 12 households equipped with 5 kW of rooftop PV and 8 kWh sonnen batteries to reduce their electricity demand from the gird by 90%.

In 2017, Natural Solar partnered with sonnen to begin rolling out the sonnenFlat model, which operates as a VPP of sorts. Namely, the model allows sonnen to have remote access to the batteries to provide power to the grid in need while offering customers all the electricity they can use for a fixed fee starting from $42 monthly.

In September, the companies revealed that the first Australian family to adopt the sonnenFlat electricity retail model has saved more than $3,400 on their energy bills in the first year of operation. Given the $18,000 solar+storage price tag, payback for the system under the sonnenFlat is less than six years.

https://www.pv-magazine-australia.com/2 ... wer-plant/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#677 Post by PeFe » Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:36 pm

Approval for the Iberdola solar/wind farm at Port Augusta.
From Renew Ecomomy
South Australia’s biggest wind solar hybrid project gets financial green light

Image


A 320MW hybrid wind and solar project near Port Augusta in South Australia will begin construction in June after its new owner, Spanish energy giant Iberdrola, gave final approval for what will be its first investment in Australia.

The Port Augusta Renewable Energy Hub has been developed by DP Energy, and has taken various forms over the last couple of years. The first stage, now comprising 210MW of wind capacity and 110MW of solar capacity, has been sold to Iberdrola, while DP Energy retains ownership of a proposed second stage featuring more solar PV and a big battery.

Iberdrola has taken the decision to fund the $500 million balance sheet from its own resources, and there is no bank finance involved at this stage. Nor is there an off take agreement. Iberdrola is big enough to take on the merchant risk itself, but discussions are likely to be held with various off-takers.

The project adds to the slew of new developments in Port Augusta, once home to the state’s two highly polluting coal power stations. The 212MW Lincoln Gap wind farm is already operating, and nearly complete, and will feature a 10MW/10MWh big battery, and the Bungala solar farm is also operating, although Enel Green Power’s Bungala’s second stage has hit technical hurdles that have limited its output.

Sanjeev Gupta has also unveiled plans for a big 100MW battery – the Playford Utility Battery, while at least two pumped hydro projects – Cultana and Goat Hill – are being considered by their respective developers.

The Port Augusta Renewable Energy Hub will result in a significant increase in the share of wind and solar in the state’s grid, and has been welcomed by the Liberal state government, which aims to reach “net 100 per cent renewables” by around 2030, and will likely do so well before then.

Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/south-austr ... ght-58154/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#678 Post by PeFe » Fri Jan 24, 2020 1:19 pm

This is great news for South Australia!
From the ABC
Electricity interconnector between SA and NSW has 'robust' business case, energy regulator finds

A planned $1.5 billion electricity interconnector between South Australia and New South Wales has been ruled to have a "robust" business case by the Australian Energy Regulator (AER), however, its economic benefit has been significantly downplayed.

Key points:
The AER says the proposed project will deliver an economic benefit to consumers
ElectraNet is now required to provide a contingent project application for approval
The SA Energy Minister says the Australian energy landscape will be transformed
The energy regulator has today given its approval for ElectraNet to carry out a "regulatory investment test" (RIT-T) on the project — known as Project EnergyConnect — with a consultation process now set to examine the public economic benefits.

The proposal is a 900-kilometre link between Robertstown, north-east of Adelaide, and Wagga Wagga, in New South Wales, which will run through Buronga, north-east of Mildura.

It is claimed the interconnector will provide lower power prices, improved energy security and increased economic activity for customers in South Australia, New South Wales and Victoria.

AER chair Clare Savage said the energy regulator was satisfied that the interconnector was the best option for meeting the needs of consumers.

"We've tested the reasonableness of ElectraNet's inputs and assumptions across a range of scenarios and found that the project, as set out in the RIT-T, is robust and will deliver a net economic benefit to Australian energy consumers," she said.

However, she said claims made by ElectraNet that the project would create an estimated economic benefit of $924 million may have been exaggerated, with the regulator estimating $269 million in benefits.

"ElectraNet assumed that without the interconnector, substantial gas-fired generation would be needed to keep the lights on in South Australia even with considerable new investment in wind, solar, batteries and synchronous condensers," she said.

"We requested ElectraNet update their modelling to reflect AEMO's system security requirements and to allow these cheaper sources of generation to compete in the market — this reduced the benefits of the interconnector substantially.

"While the benefits to energy consumers may be smaller than set out in the RIT-T they are still substantial and the interconnector therefore satisfies the requirements of the process."

Image

'More jobs and growth in South Australia'
ElectraNet had suggested power bills would be reduced by $66 a year for South Australian households and $30 in New South Wales under the project.

However, the regulator said residential consumers in South Australia should expect to pay an extra $9 per year and NSW customers $5 for the project, but said those costs would be more than offset by the benefits.

SA Energy Minister Dan van Holst Pellekaan said the Australian energy landscape would be completely transformed following the approval of the test.

"The regulatory investment test for transmission (RIT-T) approval shows that even when rigorously stress-tested, the interconnector delivers cheaper electricity to South Australians," he said.

"This project will unlock huge new renewable energy zones in South Australia and NSW with AEMO reporting there are more than 5000 MWs of planned renewable energy projects in close proximity to the interconnector.

"The AER's determination shows that South Australian wind and solar power can play a bigger national role with the interconnector, delivering more jobs and growth in South Australia."

'Important milestone' for the energy project
The approval has been welcomed by the two businesses behind the project, with ElectraNet chief executive Steve Masters describing it as another important milestone.

He said the AER had also determined that the proposed interconnector remained the most "credible option that maximises the net economic benefit" for consumers.

"The Australian Energy Market Operator's (AEMO) recently released draft 2020 Integrated System Plan identifies Project EnergyConnect as a 'no regrets' project for the national electricity market," he said.

TransGrid chief executive Paul Italiano said the two businesses were committed to delivering the project at the lowest possible cost to consumers.

They will now be required to make an application for contingent project funding with the AER for approval.

The new interconnector is scheduled to be in place by the time the coal-fired Liddell Power Station is due to retire from the market in New South Wales.

It will provide additional transfer capacity to allow for the sharing of reserves between South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales.

South Australia already has an interconnector with Victoria.

South Australia's Liberal Government announced in 2018 it would spend $14 million to accelerate the interconnector project on top of its $200 million "interconnection fund" which was announced as part of its wider energy policy ahead of the 2018 State election.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-24/ ... d/11897002

Neon have stated that if the connector goes ahead they will TRIPLE the size of their Goyder South solar/wind farm/battery project.

The interconnector could set off a boom in renewable projects (because the "market size" has suddenly increased, not only SA, AND 650 mw to Victoria via the Haywood interconnector but also 750mw to NSW)

Also means more renewable power available which will negate the cost of the interconnector (ie the less gas you use the cheaper the electricity)

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#679 Post by PeFe » Fri Jan 24, 2020 3:01 pm

And the Renew Economy article on the same subject matter
South Australia on track to 100 pct renewables, as regulator comes to party


South Australia’s plans to reach net 100 per cent renewables within a decade, and help provide renewable power to NSW to offset the closure of its coal plants have received a major boost after the Australian Energy Regulator green-lighted the business case for a major new transmission line linking the two states.

The AER on Friday approved as “robust” the regulatory investment test for transmission (RIT-T) for the $1.5 billion, 900km Project EnergyConnect transmission line proposed between Robertstown in S.A. and Wagga Wagga in NSW, a project being led by network companies ElectraNet and TransGrid.

The approval is being celebrated as an important milestone, and not just by the project’s proponents: The South Australian government on Friday described the interconnector as “the foundation piece” of its stunning net-100% renewable plans.

The new link is critical for the development of more than 5,000MW of wind, solar and storage plants in South Australia and in south west NSW, including huge projects such as Neoen’s massive Goyder project mixing wind, solar and storage, and the Susan River solar and battery storage project, which has already signed a contract with Alinta Energy.

South Australia is the main beneficiary. Its Liberal state government wants to reach “net 100 per cent” renewables by around 2030 (it will likely reach that milestone much earlier) and then become a net exporter to states such as NSW. At least half a dozen large renewables and storage projects have jockeyed for position in anticipation of the new transmission line.

“This project will unlock huge new renewable energy zones in South Australia and NSW with AEMO (the Australian Energy Market Operator)( reporting there are more than 5000MWs of planned renewable energy projects in close proximity to the interconnector,” South Australia energy minister Dan van Holst Pellekaan said in a statement.

“South Australia is determined to be a good global citizen, and become a net exporter of renewable energy as part of our aspiration of net-100% renewables in the 2030’s.

“The AER’s determination shows that South Australian wind and solar power can play a bigger national role with the interconnector, delivering more jobs and growth in South Australia.”

The link is an important part of AEMO’s Integrated System Plan, which plots a 20 year blueprint for the national grid to reach between 70 and 90 per cent renewables by 2041/42. The new line means that South Australia, already with more than 50 per cent wind and solar, will be part of a grid “loop”, rather than at the end of a skinny network.

“The SA/NSW Interconnector will also improve South Australia’s electricity systems resilience to external shocks,” van Holst Pellekaan said. “With climate change leading to increased extreme weather conditions such as storms, floods and fires, being interconnected with just Victoria leaves South Australia at real risk of becoming disconnected from the rest of the market.”

The ruling from the AER is also significant because it was delivered – as requested by AEMO and the South Australia state government – in record time as part of an overall fast-tracking of regulatory processes, which often occur at a glacial pace.

In a statement, the AER said the proposed inter-connector would facilitate the long-term transition of the energy sector to low emission energy sources and enhance power system security in South Australia.

“We’re satisfied, on the basis of the information ElectraNet has provided, that the SA-NSW interconnector is the best option for meeting the needs of consumers when compared to alternative options,” new AER chair Clare Savage said in a statement.

“We’ve tested the reasonableness of ElectraNet’s inputs and assumptions across a range of scenarios and found that the project, as set out in the RIT-T, is robust and will deliver a net economic benefit to Australian energy consumers.”

These include the recently unveiled plans of Neoen Australia, to build a massive new renewables and battery project in South Australia’s mid north, with up to 1200MW of wind, 600MW of solar, and up to 900MW of battery storage (the number of hours of storage is yet to be determined).

Neoen – which already owns and operates the Hornsdale wind farm and the neighbouring Hornsdale Power Reserve (aka, the Tesla big battery), said the interconnector would open the door for new investment, and allow all energy users in other NEM states to benefit from South Australia’s world-class wind and solar resources.

“More specifically for us at Neoen, this decision provides a foundation for a project like Goyder… which will connect into the South Australian end-point for the new interconnector,” the company said.

Solar River, which proposes to build a 200MW solar farm with 100/MW/300MWh of battery storage, said the new interconnector “will be instrumental in unlocking further stages of energy generation and storage for the project.”

The Clean Energy Council was also keen to show its support of the AER’s determination on the new link, as a demonstration of the benefits that interconnection and renewables have for consumers.

Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/south-austr ... rty-96366/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#680 Post by eKwatee » Fri Jan 31, 2020 11:48 am

A South Australian company has revealed plans to build a $650 million gas power plant, one of the largest in South Australia, near Mannum. SA Power Generation (SAPGen) has filed plans for the gas plant, and an associated solar farm and grid-scale battery, with the State Planning Commission.

article: https://www.murrayvalleystandard.com.au ... YTRhYmfrlg


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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#681 Post by PeFe » Fri Jan 31, 2020 7:28 pm

I am really surprised by this latest gas proposal considering the Barker Inlet gas plant (opened in 2019) is reportedly selling power at $150 mmw.....
that compares to $50/55 for solar or wind......

I would expect them to right back at the end of the queue when it comes to selling interstate (or even at home)

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#682 Post by SBD » Fri Jan 31, 2020 10:51 pm

PeFe wrote:
Fri Jan 31, 2020 7:28 pm
I am really surprised by this latest gas proposal considering the Barker Inlet gas plant (opened in 2019) is reportedly selling power at $150 mmw.....
that compares to $50/55 for solar or wind......

I would expect them to right back at the end of the queue when it comes to selling interstate (or even at home)
Yes, I am surprised too. The technology appears to be combined cycle gas turbines, the same as Pelican Point. One of the "temporary generation" sets is proposed to be converted to combined cycle as well. I imagine that makes it more efficient once it is warmed up. Perhaps they have a technique to fire up the gas turbines fast (like open cycle), but then capture the heat and operate in a "base-load" style as well. That could mean it is aiming at the market segment currently occupied by the aging Torrens Island plants. Planning approval is a step towards convincing someone that the business case stacks up well enough to agree to fund it.

The current price/demand cycle shows a peak an hour or two either side of sunset on hot days. If they can come up with a model that uses that, then maybe it will stack up. It will presumably tap in to the main power line from Victoria. I haven't seen any information on what the costs (or who pays for transmission losses) of using the interconnector is. This (and the solar farm planned near Murray Bridge) are presumably set up to compete with imports from Victoria, and be first in line for exports when their coal fails.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#683 Post by Jaymz » Mon Feb 03, 2020 5:42 pm

From today's Advertiser.....
SA disconnected from national electricity grid for two weeks after Victorian storm damage
The state will be disconnected from the national power grid for two weeks after storms damaged power transmission towers in Victoria.

February 3, 2020 10:17am

South Australia will be disconnected from the national electricity grid for up to two weeks after damage to transmission lines in Victoria.

Storms on Friday damaged transmission towers near the Heywood interconnector, the main link between SA and the eastern states.

SA Energy Minister Dan van Holst Pellekaan says the Australian Energy Market Operator has indicated there should be sufficient electricity available.

Loss of the interconnector has again exposed a lack of system strength that leaves South Australia vulnerable and highlights the need for a proposed new interconnector with NSW.

AEMO has also reconfigured the network to allow SA to supply electricity through the smaller MurrayLink interconnector to ensure continued power to the Alcoa Aluminium Smelter in Portland.

“South Australians know too well the damage that can be done to South Australia’s power system from storms,” Mr van Holst Pellekaan said.

“Until the second interconnector with NSW is delivered, South Australia will remain vulnerable to shocks to the system such as Friday’s storm.”

The new SA-NSW Interconnector was recently approved by the Australian Energy Regulator.

The $1.53 billion project – which promises to cut South Australian household electricity bills and create 2000 jobs – was been approved by federal regulators in January.

The project, a 900km long interconnector to NSW, will strengthen SA’s resilience against bushfires and other disasters and is tipped to open the gate for new renewable energy projects across the Mid North and Riverland.

SA’s 2016 statewide blackout was caused after a freak storm downed high-voltage transmission towers and software shut down wind farms, increasing demand on the interconnector to Victoria.

Four SA wind farm operators have since been taken to court by the AER, alleging they breached the national electricity rules.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#684 Post by PeFe » Mon Feb 03, 2020 6:16 pm

South Australia being cut off from the NEM shouldn't be an issue.

The average forecast temperature for the next 14 days for Adelaide is 26-32 degrees...so no heatwave coming up.

Even today South Australia was exporting a small amount of power via Murraylink (which is still working, its the much larger Heywood
Connector that is being repaired)

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#685 Post by Jaymz » Mon Feb 03, 2020 6:46 pm

PeFe wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 6:16 pm
South Australia being cut off from the NEM shouldn't be an issue.

The average forecast temperature for the next 14 days for Adelaide is 26-32 degrees...so no heatwave coming up.

Even today South Australia was exporting a small amount of power via Murraylink (which is still working, its the much larger Heywood
Connector that is being repaired)
So if we had a 4 day heatwave (40 plus), then we might be in a spot of bother?

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#686 Post by SBD » Mon Feb 03, 2020 8:25 pm

Jaymz wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 6:46 pm
PeFe wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 6:16 pm
South Australia being cut off from the NEM shouldn't be an issue.

The average forecast temperature for the next 14 days for Adelaide is 26-32 degrees...so no heatwave coming up.

Even today South Australia was exporting a small amount of power via Murraylink (which is still working, its the much larger Heywood
Connector that is being repaired)
So if we had a 4 day heatwave (40 plus), then we might be in a spot of bother?
It would become expensive if most of the diesel generators need to be turned on. A problem this week is that home solar and some of the older wind turbines do nothing to regulate frequency on the grid - they assume something else will do that. More load means that more of the synchronous generators need to be in use.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#687 Post by Jaymz » Mon Feb 03, 2020 8:50 pm

SBD wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 8:25 pm
Jaymz wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 6:46 pm
PeFe wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 6:16 pm
South Australia being cut off from the NEM shouldn't be an issue.

The average forecast temperature for the next 14 days for Adelaide is 26-32 degrees...so no heatwave coming up.

Even today South Australia was exporting a small amount of power via Murraylink (which is still working, its the much larger Heywood
Connector that is being repaired)
So if we had a 4 day heatwave (40 plus), then we might be in a spot of bother?
It would become expensive if most of the diesel generators need to be turned on. A problem this week is that home solar and some of the older wind turbines do nothing to regulate frequency on the grid - they assume something else will do that. More load means that more of the synchronous generators need to be in use.
Weren't the diesel generators meant to be converted to gas by now, and privatized?

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#688 Post by Norman » Mon Feb 03, 2020 9:17 pm

This is the last summer that the emergency generators are in public hands.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#689 Post by SBD » Mon Feb 03, 2020 9:21 pm

Jaymz wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 8:50 pm
SBD wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 8:25 pm
Jaymz wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 6:46 pm


So if we had a 4 day heatwave (40 plus), then we might be in a spot of bother?
It would become expensive if most of the diesel generators need to be turned on. A problem this week is that home solar and some of the older wind turbines do nothing to regulate frequency on the grid - they assume something else will do that. More load means that more of the synchronous generators need to be in use.
Weren't the diesel generators meant to be converted to gas by now, and privatized?
That is scheduled for May 2020, as they will be moved to other places, but only applies to the "Temporary Generation" facilities owned by the state government. The five turbines at the former Holden plant will be leased by Nexif Energy (who own the Lincoln Gap wind farm) and moved to Outer Harbor (Pelican Point ROad I think). They also plan to convert them to combined cycle gas eventually. The four turbines presently at the desalination plant will be leased to Infigen Energy (Lake Bonney wind farm in SA) and moved to Bolivar.

The diesel power stations at Port Stanvac, Lonsdale, Angaston owned by Snowy Hydro and Port Lincoln and Snuggery owned by Synergen aren't being sold as far as I know.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#690 Post by Jaymz » Mon Feb 03, 2020 11:13 pm

SBD wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 9:21 pm
Jaymz wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 8:50 pm
SBD wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 8:25 pm


It would become expensive if most of the diesel generators need to be turned on. A problem this week is that home solar and some of the older wind turbines do nothing to regulate frequency on the grid - they assume something else will do that. More load means that more of the synchronous generators need to be in use.
Weren't the diesel generators meant to be converted to gas by now, and privatized?
That is scheduled for May 2020, as they will be moved to other places, but only applies to the "Temporary Generation" facilities owned by the state government. The five turbines at the former Holden plant will be leased by Nexif Energy (who own the Lincoln Gap wind farm) and moved to Outer Harbor (Pelican Point ROad I think). They also plan to convert them to combined cycle gas eventually. The four turbines presently at the desalination plant will be leased to Infigen Energy (Lake Bonney wind farm in SA) and moved to Bolivar.

The diesel power stations at Port Stanvac, Lonsdale, Angaston owned by Snowy Hydro and Port Lincoln and Snuggery owned by Synergen aren't being sold as far as I know.
Sounds complicated for something that's kinda important :sly:

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