SA Economy

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Jaymz
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Re: SA Economy

#721 Post by Jaymz » Tue Jun 06, 2023 4:10 pm

A crowd of 48,000 for the state Of Origin is a good result in my book. I don't feel like the few thousand empty seats were noticeable on the TV, they were in the far corner of each of the stands, the Riverbank Stand in particular.

Let's be realistic too, Rugby played on an oval rather than a true rectangular pitch is never going to be as good from a spectator's perspective.

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Re: SA Economy

#722 Post by rev » Tue Jun 06, 2023 9:31 pm

Jaymz wrote:
Tue Jun 06, 2023 4:10 pm
A crowd of 48,000 for the state Of Origin is a good result in my book. I don't feel like the few thousand empty seats were noticeable on the TV, they were in the far corner of each of the stands, the Riverbank Stand in particular.

Let's be realistic too, Rugby played on an oval rather than a true rectangular pitch is never going to be as good from a spectator's perspective.
They're only crying about it in NSW because they didn't want the opening game of Origin to be held outside of NSW/QLD to begin with.
They've found a straw to clutch at and they did, to justify their position.

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Re: SA Economy

#723 Post by abc » Sun Jun 11, 2023 1:06 pm

WGG wrote:
Tue Jun 06, 2023 2:53 pm
abc wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2023 11:39 pm
rev wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2023 9:26 pm


48k to a sporting event that the majority have no interest for or even understand, is a pretty good turn out.

If the NRL had the vision to setup a team in Adelaide, and followed through with supporting it financially to ensure it survived long enough to stand on it's own feet like the AFL does with new franchises ie Gold Coast & GWS, then I think NRL would do well here considering NRL games in for example NSW don't exactly draw massive crowds.
they gave away thousands of free tickets and probably wont be back any time soon as these games need to be sold out...as they have been in Perth and Melbourne routinely
Please provide the sources to your ambit claims.
are you disputing the fact that Optus Stadium was sold out twice?

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Re: SA Economy

#724 Post by rev » Mon Jun 12, 2023 12:13 pm

Perth has a huge population of "expats" from NSW & QLD who work in mining. :roll:

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Re: SA Economy

#725 Post by abc » Tue Jun 13, 2023 2:58 pm

rev wrote:
Mon Jun 12, 2023 12:13 pm
Perth has a huge population of "expats" from NSW & QLD who work in mining. :roll:
and your point is?

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Re: SA Economy

#726 Post by SRW » Thu Jun 15, 2023 3:50 pm

Today's state budget is pretty uneventful, but the few interesting bits to me included:
  • no extra funding allocated to Tarkarri
  • $15 million dollars for 'waterproofing' at Adelaide Railway Station, which presumably could mean upgrading the long-maligned ceiling in the platform area
  • $348.9m for a new combined facility for Forensic Science SA and SAPOL's Forensic Services Branch, which could mean a decently sized new build in the city
  • indication that at least some state funding(i.e. a minority portion) may be contributed to the new Crows HQ, which could rouse complaints given lack of funds for arts and other areas.
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Re: SA Economy

#727 Post by gnrc_louis » Thu Jun 15, 2023 4:07 pm

SRW wrote:
Thu Jun 15, 2023 3:50 pm
Today's state budget is pretty uneventful, but the few interesting bits to me included:
  • no extra funding allocated to Tarkarri
  • $15 million dollars for 'waterproofing' at Adelaide Railway Station, which presumably could mean upgrading the long-maligned ceiling in the platform area
  • $348.9m for a new combined facility for Forensic Science SA and SAPOL's Forensic Services Branch, which could mean a decently sized new build in the city
  • indication that at least some state funding(i.e. a minority portion) may be contributed to the new Crows HQ, which could rouse complaints given lack of funds for arts and other areas.
Yet another budget where public transport is almost entirely overlooked. Unsurprisingly, the main focus is on health which makes sense considering the Government were basically elected on the promise to "fix" ramping. If we don't start seeing tangible outcomes in that space in the years leading up to 2026, at least that election might be closely fought - not that the opposition have shown any sort of inspiring or visionary alternative under Speirs.

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Re: SA Economy

#728 Post by ChillyPhilly » Thu Jun 15, 2023 4:27 pm

Cryptic wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2023 11:03 pm
A-Town wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2023 9:53 pm
rev wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2023 9:26 pm


48k to a sporting event that the majority have no interest for or even understand, is a pretty good turn out.

If the NRL had the vision to setup a team in Adelaide, and followed through with supporting it financially to ensure it survived long enough to stand on it's own feet like the AFL does with new franchises ie Gold Coast & GWS, then I think NRL would do well here considering NRL games in for example NSW don't exactly draw massive crowds.
If Adelaide had an NRL team, I can see its crowds being similar to Adelaide United's which would be on par with a few Sydney NRL teams.

The question is though, where would they play? Is Hindmarsh's pitch long enough for NRL requirements?
Yep. Rugby League pitch must be 68m wide and 112 - 122m long. Hindmarsh is 80m wide and 120m long. NRL has already been played there afaik.
The stands at the north and south would need to be altered - made shorter - to allow for the in-goal area of league pitches.
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Re: SA Economy

#729 Post by Jaymz » Thu Jun 15, 2023 8:20 pm

abc wrote:
Sun Jun 11, 2023 1:06 pm
are you disputing the fact that Optus Stadium was sold out twice?
Pretty sure he was referring to your remark about them giving away thousands of free tickets.

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Re: SA Economy

#730 Post by rev » Sat Jun 17, 2023 11:18 am

gnrc_louis wrote:
Thu Jun 15, 2023 4:07 pm
SRW wrote:
Thu Jun 15, 2023 3:50 pm
Today's state budget is pretty uneventful, but the few interesting bits to me included:
  • no extra funding allocated to Tarkarri
  • $15 million dollars for 'waterproofing' at Adelaide Railway Station, which presumably could mean upgrading the long-maligned ceiling in the platform area
  • $348.9m for a new combined facility for Forensic Science SA and SAPOL's Forensic Services Branch, which could mean a decently sized new build in the city
  • indication that at least some state funding(i.e. a minority portion) may be contributed to the new Crows HQ, which could rouse complaints given lack of funds for arts and other areas.
Yet another budget where public transport is almost entirely overlooked. Unsurprisingly, the main focus is on health which makes sense considering the Government were basically elected on the promise to "fix" ramping. If we don't start seeing tangible outcomes in that space in the years leading up to 2026, at least that election might be closely fought - not that the opposition have shown any sort of inspiring or visionary alternative under Speirs.
The big priorities front and centre in peoples minds are the cost of living/housing affordability and health care.
The government not allocating funding for any big ticket public transport projects, like electrifying the rest of the train network or tram network expansion, shows they're scared of negative reactions, given they are spending billions on the north south corridor. Scared that people will question them why they'd spend hundreds of millions, if not a billion or two on say trams for example during a cost of living crisis, as opposed to giving people more relief for say rising power prices.

There's an estimated 2 million more migrants coming in the next 24 months. To do what? What jobs? Someone point the existing 26 million Australian's in the direction of where all these magical jobs are?
What our state government could do, with infrastructure projects, is target that type of skilled migration. That will help build up our state.

Nothing extra being spent for the space industry, $5.4 million to establish an office of paper pushers for the AUKUS submarines.

They are cutting 50 more executives from government departments, saving $50 million. That's a decent start, they should trim that shit down even more and redirect the tens of millions saved from oversized public sector agencies with outrageous salaries towards things this state needs, like improved health care, education, road maintenance etc.

Stamp duty for first home buyers has been dropped too for homes up to $650,000 and land up to $400,000.

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Re: SA Economy

#731 Post by rev » Mon Jun 26, 2023 1:26 pm


  • Adelaide - Clare Mockler
    Current: $363,636 plus 10.5 per cent super
    New: Total package of up to $431,600

    Burnside – Chris Cowley
    Current: $251,142 plus super (amount unspecified), car and tablet
    New: Total package of up to $351,520

    Campbelltown - Paul Di Iulio
    Current: $287,658 plus super (amount unspecified), car, two weeks extra leave
    New: Total package of up to $380,640

    Charles Sturt – Paul Sutton
    Current: $308,841 plus $37,582 in super and $11,500 in salary sacrificing for a car
    New: Total package of up to $402,480

    Gawler - Henry Inat
    Current: $260,536 plus super (amount unspecified), car
    New: Total package of up to $351,520

    Mitcham - Matt Pears
    Current: $286,015 plus super (amount unspecified), car, extra week of leave
    New: Total package of up to $380,640

    Mount Barker - Andrew Stuart
    Current: $280,268 plus super (amount unspecified and 2.5 per cent extra), car
    New: Total package of up to $380,640

    Norwood Payneham and St Peters – Mario Barone
    Current: $265,000 plus 9.5 per cent super and car
    New: Total package of up to $351,520

    Port Adelaide Enfield – Mark Withers
    Current: Total package of $353,998, including super
    New: Total package of up to $402,480

    Salisbury - John Harry
    Current $326,266 plus super (amount unspecified)
    New: Total package of up to $380,640

    Unley – Peter Tsokas
    Current: $292,208 plus super (amount unspecified) and car
    New: Total package of up to $380,000
https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/sou ... d5c5a276ca

This is what the "CEO's" of our local councils are getting paid, and their new packages.
Wonderful isn't it? While the rest of South Australia struggles to get by with a cost of living crisis, these bastards are raising council rates and giving them selves thousands of dollars in pay rises. We're not paying higher rates for improved or maintained services, given you barely see a council watering truck let alone anything else ever being done on the regular, we're paying to fund luxurious lifestyles.

Public "service" never looked so tough.
Clearly no cost of living crisis within our councils.

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Re: SA Economy

#732 Post by [Shuz] » Mon Jun 26, 2023 5:59 pm

This is a joke right?

They should be getting 200k at most.
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Re: SA Economy

#733 Post by Jaymz » Wed Aug 02, 2023 5:54 pm

Excuse the lateness, but the CommSec State of the States report was released for the June '23 quarter a while back.

S.A has moved from equal second to third spot. Adelaide recorded the highest inflation rate, not really a metric you want to be leading.

Click on the link to see in more detail.....

https://www.commsec.com.au/content/dam/ ... y_2023.pdf

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Re: SA Economy

#734 Post by rev » Tue Aug 15, 2023 2:39 pm

Not sure where else to put this..
Committee for Adelaide report reveals Adelaide’s lack of vibrancy, innovation is holding the city back
Adelaide has been measured against 19 mid-sized global cities in a new study, and while the city scores highly on liveability there are two crucial missing links. Do you agree?

Giuseppe Tauriello @gtauriello 5 min read August 15, 2023 - 8:59AM The Australian Business Network


Adelaide is well placed to capitalise on the rise of mid-sized cities in the wake of Covid-19, but a new injection of vibrancy and innovation is needed to compete in the global war for the best and brightest, a major study says.

According to new global research Adelaide scores highly for liveability, affordability and the strength of the city’s arts scene, but rates poorly on benchmarks around innovation, vibrancy and transport.

Released on Tuesday, the Benchmarking Adelaide 2023 report compares the city against 19 peer cities of a similar size, on measures ranging from innovation, skills, transport, liveability and reputation.

Measured against cities including Austin, Valencia, Cape Town, Muscat and Auckland, Adelaide ranks third for business and investment dynamics and fifth for liveability, affordability and well-being.

But it lags most other cities when it comes to innovation and vibrancy – ranking 15th in terms of innovation and R&D, and 16th for amenity, vibrancy and experience.

Adelaide ranks around the middle of the pack on other metrics around transport and infrastructure, skills and talent, sustainability, global visibility and perception.

The report, compiled by British urban consultancy The Business of Cities, was commissioned by Committee for Adelaide and its partners JLL, Deloitte, RAA and Hames Sharley.

It says the city’s relatively low cost of doing business and emerging industries such as artificial intelligence were attracting interest from global investors, but a lack of funding available to start-ups and a failure to convert research into commercial opportunities was holding back the city’s economy.

Innovation districts such as Lot Fourteen, Tonsley and BioMed City could act as “flagships” showcasing the city’s capabilities, the report says, backed by the merger of the universities of Adelaide and South Australia, which could drive innovation across industries.

“Adelaide excels for scientific research but would improve over a wider set of innovation measures if the university merger and wider public policies could achieve higher collaboration with industry, more access to late stage capital, smoother public sector procurement and decision making, more speed and scale for foundational projects, and effective incentives to innovate throughout the whole innovation value chain,” the report says.

“The merger of Adelaide’s two largest universities creates a big chance for reputational and societal impacts.

“Becoming perceived as a city of opportunity to scale is key to retaining and maximising talent. Otherwise many firms may continue to move to other cities.”

Committee for Adelaide chief executive Sam Dighton said the report reinforces Adelaide’s reputation as a great place to live and work, but also identifies weaknesses that are “holding back our true economic and social potential”.

He said Adelaide’s labour productivity was tracking nearly 20 per cent lower than peer cities.

“Crucially, the report highlights that Adelaide’s economic productivity is lagging that of its comparable international peers, and we have a lower share of jobs in high-wage, knowledge-rich sectors,” he said.

“We should not shy away from the challenges that face us, and this report provides a fresh perspective on the opportunities to guide our city’s reinvention and how we can capitalise on our advantages in key industries to attract and retain talent.”

Amenity, vibrancy and experience is another area identified as a weakness in the report.

While Adelaide is considered a “hub of festivals, music and film”, and ranks second for its contemporary arts scene, the city is not yet seen as a leader for the “highest rated” experiences, the report says.

“Adelaide is a gastronomy and festival capital and still has great potential to deliver on its ‘boutique’ promise through placemaking and amenity,” the report says.

“But currently this area emerges as a strategic weakness for Adelaide in an international context. The scale of the urban cultural and creative economy is also behind. Given the role culture and vibrancy have in talent attraction, this area could affect many of Adelaide’s wider economic ambitions.

“Adelaide is sometimes penalised by global benchmarks that still look at absolute size and volume rather than quality or participation. The main ways that mid-sized cities tend to overcome this disadvantage is through compelling stories, sub-cultures, neighbourhoods or signature designs that attract international interest.”

In terms of amenity, an “inefficient” level of car dependence and failure to densify the city has left Adelaide at the bottom of the pack for walkability, quality of the cycling network and commute times.

The report says that while many people around the world are aware of South Australia’s world-class wine regions, natural environment and quality of life, the city is not currently recognised as a dynamic place for business, careers, innovation and creativity.

“Adelaide seems to lack a business brand,” it says.

“The data points to Adelaide’s relatively under-developed identity around innovation, enterprise, creativity, cultural expression and climate responsibility.

“Cities that have improved in terms of brand perception and global appeal have tended to build a clear unified identity that spans visitors, entrepreneurs, business, students and investors.”
https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/business ... 1692056184

Not sure where else to put this.
More of the usual state the obvious crap that we've heard before, this time from the Committee for Adelaide people.
I wonder if they did their own research etc, or just copied every other similar report from other groups and put it in their own words.
Usual lots of talking and no action from any of these groups that want to be, or think they are, so influential.

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Re: SA Economy

#735 Post by abc » Wed Aug 16, 2023 4:00 am

“The data points to Adelaide’s relatively under-developed identity around innovation, enterprise, creativity, cultural expression and climate responsibility.
apparently that's a thing now :sly:

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